Adinandra Jack

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Sources

New Trees

Family

  • Ternstroemiaceae (or Pentaphylacaceae)

Species in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
caducous
Falling off early.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hermaphrodite
Having both male and female parts in a single flower; bisexual.
imbricate
Overlapping.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
pedicel
Stalk of a single flower.
petiolate
Bearing a petiole.
pubescent
Covered in hairs.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

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New Trees

There are approximately 90 species of Adinandra, distributed across southern and eastern Asia, of which only A. millettii is in cultivation. They are evergreen trees or shrubs with alternate, petiolate, entire or serrulate leaves. Adinandra flowers are solitary or in pairs, and hermaphrodite; the pedicel is recurved (usually) or erect (rarely). The flowers are subtended by two bracteoles at the base of the pedicel; these are persistent or caducous. The flowers are 5-merous; the sepals are thick, imbricate, persistent; the petals imbricate, glabrous or with silky hairs on the outsides; the stamens, 15–60, are in one to five whorls, filaments free or fused together; the ovary pubescent or glabrous. The fruit is a many-seeded berry with a persistent style (Kobuski 1947, Ming & Bartholomew 2007).

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