Berberidopsis corallina Hook. f.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberidopsis corallina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberidopsis/berberidopsis-corallina/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Common Names

  • Coral Plant

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    Extinct
    IUCN Red List conservation category: ‘there is no reasonable doubt that the last individual [of taxon] has died’.
    glaucous
    Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
    globose
    globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
    inflorescence
    Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    pendent
    Hanging.
    keel petal
    (in the flowers of some legumes) The two front petals fused together to form a keel-like structure.
    raceme
    Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Berberidopsis corallina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberidopsis/berberidopsis-corallina/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

    An evergreen, scandent shrub of remarkable beauty. Leaves alternate, ovate or heart-shaped, rather hard in texture, the apex and margins set with spiny teeth; dark green above, glaucous beneath, 112 to 4 in. long. Flowers produced in the axils of the uppermost leaves and in a terminal raceme, the whole forming a crowded group of pendent blossoms. Each flower is borne on a slender stalk, 112 to 2 in. long, deep red like the flower itself which is globose, 12 in. across, composed of nine to fifteen petal-like segments, the outer ones of which are small and spreading, the inner ones larger and concave, all of the deep fine red which pervades the whole inflorescence. Bot. Mag., t. 5343.

    Native of Chile, where it is said to be confined to the forests behind the port of Coronel, in Arauco province, and may by now be extinct even there; intro­duced by Richard Pearce in 1862. It is one of the most gorgeous of climbers but not completely hardy nor easy to suit. In favoured western gardens it can be trained up trees or allowed to ramble among shrubs, but elsewhere it needs the protection of a wall and must be carefully sited. A deep, moist soil is best, and a position where it is sheltered from drying winds and strong sun. A north wall is suitable so long as it is not exposed to winds from that quarter.

    It commences to flower in July and continues in beauty for two or three months. The fruits form in this country, but do not usually produce good seed. Young plants can be raised from cuttings or layers. A little peaty soil should be put about the roots when first planted out but once established they will grow vigorously. This species will tolerate a slightly alkaline soil if peat is added, but is not really suited to chalky ones.

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