Berberis hispanica Boiss. & Reut.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis hispanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-hispanica/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Other species in genus

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.
subspecies
(subsp.) Taxonomic rank for a group of organisms showing the principal characters of a species but with significant definable morphological differentiation. A subspecies occurs in populations that can occupy a distinct geographical range or habitat.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Berberis hispanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/berberis/berberis-hispanica/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

A deciduous shrub to 5 ft high, of open habit and with dark red stems. Spines three-parted or single, 12 to 34 in. long. Leaves entire or with a few distant teeth, 13 to 1 in. long, 14 to 12 in. wide, elliptic to obovate, with a tapering base. Flowers six to fifteen in a cluster or short raceme, orange-yellow. Berries ovoid, black and slightly glaucous, 14 in. long.

Native of the mountains of S.E. Spain, Morocco, and Algeria. It has been regarded by some authorities as a variety or subspecies of B. vulgaris, but is very distinct from this in its blue-black fruits and red stems. By Dr Ahrendt it is placed in the section Crataeginae, together with B. aetnensis (q.v.) and the little-known B. crataegina of Asia Minor. The common barberry has its closest allies not in Europe, but in E. Asia.

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