Buxus harlandii Hance

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Buxus harlandii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/buxus/buxus-harlandii/). Accessed 2020-10-23.

Genus

Glossary

staminate
Male referring to male plants (dioecy) or flowers (monoecy) or the male parts of a hermaphrodite flower.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
emarginate
Notched at the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
herbarium
A collection of preserved plant specimens; also the building in which such specimens are housed.
oblanceolate
Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
pistillate
Female referring to female plants (dioecy) or flowers (monoecy) or the female parts of a hermaphrodite flower.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
staminate
Male referring to male plants (dioecy) or flowers (monoecy) or the male parts of a hermaphrodite flower.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Buxus harlandii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/buxus/buxus-harlandii/). Accessed 2020-10-23.

A dwarf shrub 6 in. to 2 ft or so high; young branchlets slender, glabrous, or with a few short hairs near the nodes. Leaves oblanceolate to obovate-oblong, 12 to 114 in. long, 16 to 14 in. wide, emarginate at the apex, very gradually tapered at the base. Staminate flowers stalked, the pistillate ones sessile; rudimentary ovary of the staminate flowers as long as the inner sepals; style of the pistillate flowers as long as the ovary (in B. microphylla and its varieties the style is only half as long as the ovary).

Native of Central and S. China, where it is found growing among rocks and stones in the beds of rivers and streams. The true species may not be in cultivation and would probably be tender, coming as it does from low elevations where the winters are mild. The plant grown in gardens as “B. harlandii” is not this species but a form of B. microphylla var. sinica and of uncertain origin. It was once grown in gardens as “B chinensis”. The confusion seems to have arisen from the fact that on Hance’s herbarium sheet there are two specimens – one the true B. harlandii and the other B. microphylla var. sinica.

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