Kalmia polifolia Wangenh.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Kalmia polifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/kalmia/kalmia-polifolia/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

Genus

Synonyms

  • K. glauca Ait.
  • K. glauca var. rosmarinifolia Pursh
  • K. polifolia var. rosmarinifolia (Pursh) Rehd.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Kalmia polifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/kalmia/kalmia-polifolia/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

An evergreen shrub 1 to 2 ft high, of rather thin, erect, bifurcating habit, but bushy; young shoots two-edged, covered with a fine down at first. Leaves opposite or in threes, narrowly oblong or ovate, 34 to 112 in. long, 18 to 38 in. wide, plane or recurved at the margins, tapered at both ends, dark lustrous green above and glabrous except on the midrib, lower surface glaucous white. Flowers in a terminal, flattish cluster 1 to 112 in. across, produced late in April; flower-stalks glabrous, very slender. Calyx-lobes ovate-oblong. Corolla saucer-shaped, about 12 in. across, with five broad, shallow lobes, of a beautiful pale purplish rose. Stamens of the same colour, but with brown anthers. Bot. Mag., t. 177.

Native of both eastern and western N. America; introduced in 1767. Naturally a plant of bogs and other wet places, it likes a cool, moist soil. Under the drier conditions usually given it in cultivation it is a sturdier more erect shrub than it appears to be in nature, where it is said to be straggling. It is very hardy and one of the brightest of spring-flowering shrubs of its colour.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

[var. microphylla] – In both the revisions of Kalmia cited above this is accorded species status – K. microphylla (Hook.) Heller.

K. occidentalis Small (not mentioned in the main work) is not a distinct species but an intermediate between K. polifolia and K. microphylla. Ebinger places it under the latter as K. microphylla var. occidentalis (Small) Ebinger, while Southall and Hardin include it in K. microphylla without distinction.


var. microphylla (Hook.) Rehd.

Synonyms
K. glauca var. microphylla Hook.
K. microphylla (Hook.) Heller

A dwarf, spreading shrub usually less than 6 in. high. Leaves {3/8} to {3/4} in. long, half or less wide. Flowers about {3/8} in. wide, usually rose-purple. An alpine variety of the species ranging from Alaska to California and Colorado. For a photograph of this variety taken in Colorado see New Fl. & Sylv., Vol. 8, fig. lvii.

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