Laburnum caramanicum (Boiss.) Benth. & Hook. f.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Laburnum caramanicum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/laburnum/laburnum-caramanicum/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Podocytisus caramanicus Boiss.

Glossary

standard petal
(in the flowers of some legumes) Large upper petal; also known as ‘vexillum’.
bracteole
Small bract. Typically borne on pedicel of a flower.
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Laburnum caramanicum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/laburnum/laburnum-caramanicum/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Although described as a small tree in its native country, this species is usually seen in Great Britain as a shrub 3 to 6 ft high. It is deciduous, and has a thin habit, making long, straight, erect shoots, which towards the end of the summer produce near the top a number of short, stiff twigs, each terminated by an erect raceme of flowers. Leaves grey-green, trifoliolate, short-stalked; leaflets almost stalkless, obovate, with a short abrupt point, from 14 to 34 in. long, the side ones the smaller. Racemes terminal, erect, 3 to 7 in. long. Flowers golden yellow, 34 in. long; the stalk slender, 14 in. long, with a small bracteole about the middle. Standard petal roundish, 12 in. in diameter. Seed-pods 2 to 3 in. long, 12 in. wide, flat, the upper seam, distinctly winged, developing one to four seeds. Bot. Mag., t. 7898.

Native of the southern Balkans and Asia Minor; introduced about 1879, but still very uncommon. It has lived outside at Kew for a good many years, but the shoots are cut back severely every winter. Owing to its flowering late in the season on the shoots of the year, this does not affect its blossoming, although the plants increase slowly in size. To be seen at its best, no doubt, it needs a hotter, sunnier climate than ours. It flowers too late to ripen seed with certainty, but they do occasionally ripen. Cuttings taken in August will strike root in gentle heat.

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