Lardizabala biternata Ruiz & Pavon

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lardizabala biternata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lardizabala/lardizabala-biternata/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    crenate
    With rounded teeth at the edge.
    mealy
    Covered with coarse flour-like powder. (Cf. farinose.)
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    sessile
    Lacking a stem or stalk.
    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    unisexual
    Having only male or female organs in a flower.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Lardizabala biternata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lardizabala/lardizabala-biternata/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

    A vigorous evergreen climber, with ternate, biternate, and triternate leaves. The three, six, or nine leaflets are of hard texture, each 2 to 4 in. long, the middle one of each trio the largest. They vary much in outline, but are mostly ovate, the lateral ones more or less oblique, and often sessile, margins shallowly crenate, with here and there a sharply pointed tooth; leaf-stalks covered with short brown hairs. Flowers functionally unisexual; males 34 in. across, produced in drooping spikes 3 to 4 in. long from the leaf axils; the sepals form the most effective part of the flower, being broadly ovate, fleshy and dark chocolate purple; petals small, narrow, white and mealy. Female flowers on slender stalks 1 in. long, solitary in the leaf-axils, rather larger than the male. Fruits sausage-shaped, 2 to 3 in. long; seeds flattened and about the size of small peas. Bot. Mag., t. 4501.

    Native of Chile; introduced in 1844, it flowered in the Exeter nursery of Messrs Veitch five years later. Seen in flower, it is very striking. The fruit is sweet, pulpy, and edible, and is said to be sold in the markets of Chile. This climber is essentially one for the milder parts of the kingdom. It is too tender to be satisfactory even on a wall at Kew.

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