Leptodermis

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leptodermis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leptodermis/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Family

  • Rubiaceae

Glossary

appressed
Lying flat against an object.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
dimorphic
Occurring in two forms.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
exserted
Protruding; pushed out.
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
included
(botanical) Contained within another part or organ.
involucre
A ring of bracts surrounding an inflorescence.
linear
Strap-shaped.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leptodermis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leptodermis/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A genus of about thirty species of deciduous shrubs native of the Himalaya, Japan, and China. They belong to the madder family, which is very meagrely represented in the open with us (save by the native bedstraws and woodruffs, etc.). They have opposite, entire leaves with persistent stipules. The flowers are borne in clusters on the growing shoots, each enclosed at the base in an involucre made up of two united bracteoles. The corolla is tubular or slenderly funnel-shaped, with usually five lobes. Stamens borne in the throat of the corolla, equal in number to the lobes. The ovary is inferior, bearing a single style, dividing at the top into five linear arms. Fruit a capsule, splitting into five valves, but the inner wall of the valves remaining closed and enveloping each seed in a loose or appressed fibrous coat. The flowers in Leptodermis are usually dimorphic, the functionally female flowers having the style exserted and the stamens included in the corolla-tube, while in the functionally male flowers the style is included and the anthers exserted.

The cultivated species are sun-lovers, being often found wild in dry stony places. Propagation is by cuttings.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.