Leucopogon fraseri A. Cunn.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leucopogon fraseri' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leucopogon/leucopogon-fraseri/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Cyathodes fraseri (A. Cunn.) H. H. Allan

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    style
    Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.
    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    drupe
    A fleshy dehiscent or indehiscent fruit with one to several seeds each enclosed in a hard endocarp (the stone).

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Leucopogon fraseri' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leucopogon/leucopogon-fraseri/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

    A dwarf evergreen shrub 3 to 6 in. high, of close compact growth, forming a dense mat and spreading by underground stems. Branchlets more or less erect, very slender, minutely downy when young, almost entirely hidden by the foliage. Leaves stalkless, alternate, overlapping each other, obovate-oblong, abruptly tapered at the apex to a slender, bristle-like tip, 18 to 316 in. long, 116 to 112 in. wide, dull green, the longitudinal veins distinct beneath, margins fringed with tiny hairs. Flowers sweetly scented, solitary in the leaf-axils. Corolla a slender tube 38 in. long, pinkish white, divided at the mouth into five short triangular lobes which are downy on the underside; inside of tube hairy. The four brown anthers are fixed near the top of the corolla tube and have very short stalks. Style slender, downy. Fruit an oblong drupe, 13 in. long, yellowish orange, sweet and edible.

    Native of New Zealand up to 4,500 ft altitude, where it was found by C. Fraser in 1820; also of Tasmania and Australia. I do not know when this interesting little shrub was originally introduced, but I first saw it in Messrs Cunningham and Fraser’s nursery at Comely Bank, Edinburgh, in 1911, and obtained it for Kew, where it has proved hardy. It does not flower freely enough to render it very noticeable, but it makes a neat tuft a few inches high very suitable for the rock garden, and its flowers, borne in May and June, have a hay-like fragrance.

    From the Supplement (Vol. V)

    This species was described from New Zealand. The form occurring in south-east Australia and Tasmania is by some authorities accepted as a distinct species – L. stuartii F. v. Muell.

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