Leucothoë axillaris (Lam.) D. Don

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leucothoë axillaris' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leucothoe/leucothoe-axillaris/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Andromeda axillaris Lam.
  • L. catesbaei (Walt.) A. Gray
  • Andromeda catesbaei Walt.

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leucothoë axillaris' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leucothoe/leucothoe-axillaris/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

An evergreen shrub 2 to 4 ft high, with spreading branches zigzagged towards the end, clothed with very short down when young. Leaves leathery, ovate to ovate-oblong, 2 to 412 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, usually abruptly and shortly pointed, spine-toothed, mainly in the upper half, dark glossy green and glabrous above, pale and with scattered hairs beneath; stalk 14 in. or less long. Flowers produced during April and May in axillary racemes 1 to 212 in. long, crowded, and very shortly stalked. Corolla white, cylindrical or pitcher-shaped, narrowing slightly towards the mouth, where are five ovate teeth; sepals ovate; flower-stalks minutely downy.

Native of the south-eastern United States from Virginia southwards; introduced in 1765. It is not so common in cultivation as L. fontanesiana, which it much resembles, and with which it is much confused. Its leaves, however, are comparatively shorter and broader, and abruptly pointed; their stalks are also shorter, and the sepals are broader. Coming from the lowlands of Virginia, Florida, etc., it is much less hardy than L. fontanesiana, which inhabits the mountains. Personally, I have only seen one or two plants, and they were not in good health. A dwarf form of L. fontanesiana is sometimes offered for it.


var. ambigens Fern

Leaves lanceolate or narrowly lanceolate, less abruptly pointed.

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