Ligustrum ovalifolium Hassk.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ligustrum ovalifolium' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ligustrum/ligustrum-ovalifolium/). Accessed 2020-10-26.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ligustrum ovalifolium' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ligustrum/ligustrum-ovalifolium/). Accessed 2020-10-26.

A semi-evergreen or, in severe winters or in poor soil, a deciduous shrub 10 to 15 ft high, of vigorous growth, forming a dense thicket of erect stems; young shoots usually quite glabrous. Leaves 1 to 212 in. long, 12 to 114 in. wide, oval, wedge-shaped at the base, blunt or pointed at the apex, glossy green and glabrous on both surfaces; stalk 18 in. long. Flowers produced during July in a stiff, erect, terminal panicle, 2 to 4 in. high and about the same wide; they are very crowded in the panicle, dull white, and have a heavy, unpleasant odour. Calyx and individual flower-stalk smooth. Corolla 13 in. long. Fruits globose, shining, black.

Native of Japan. The oval-leaved privet is a worthy associate of the common one for dark corners or places starved by roots of trees where scarcely anything else will grow. For hedges it is preferable to the common privet because of its more evergreen nature; it has, in fact, almost entirely displaced it for that purpose. It is not worthy of being put to better use, being of stiff, ungainly habit, its flowers dull, and to most people evil-smelling.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

† L. ‘Vicaryi’. – Leaves golden yellow. Distributed from the Vicary Gibbs collection at Aldenham in 1922. It was considered by Rehder to be a hybrid between L. ovalifolium and L. vulgare (L. × vicaryi Rehd.).


'Argenteum'

Leaves bordered with creamy white. This pale variegation is not as rich and effective as that of the following.

'Aureum' Golden Privet

Leaves green only in the centre, with a border of varying width of rich golden yellow. This is the most popular of all variegated shrubs, and has been propagated by hundred of thousands for town planting. Although it is the fashion to revile it, it certainly produces a very bright effect and brings colour into many a hemmed-in garden or dull city yard where little of any kind will grow. It is also useful in a small state for town window-boxes. In habit it is less rigid and more graceful than the type and the young shoots, seen under the lens, are thickly but very minutely downy.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.