Linnaea borealis L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Linnaea borealis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/linnaea/linnaea-borealis/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Common Names

  • Twin-flower

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    entire
    With an unbroken margin.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.
    midrib
    midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
    ovary
    Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Linnaea borealis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/linnaea/linnaea-borealis/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

    A creeping evergreen plant, a few inches high with a woody base; branches long, slender, wire-like, hairy when young. Leaves opposite, obovate, oval or ovate; 14 to 34 in. long, 18 to 12 in. wide, rounded or broadly tapered and coarsely toothed at the apex, wedge-shaped and entire at the base with scattered hairs on the margin, upper surface, and on the midrib below; stalk 112 to 16 in. long. Flowers produced in summer, in a pair at the top of an erect, threadlike stalk, 112 to 3 in. high, terminating short, erect, lateral twigs; each flower has its own secondary stalk 12 to 34 in. long. Corolla pink or white, 12 in. long, nodding, funnel-shaped, with five rounded lobes, hairy inside; calyx with five linear lobes; stamens four; ovary hairy. Fruits dry, yellow, one-seeded, downy.

    This little plant is found in the high latitudes of the northern hemisphere including a few places in the north-east of Britain. It is a dainty plant with pretty, fragrant flowers, best adapted for some shady moist spot in the rock garden in rather sandy soil. It is naturalised under pines and bracken at the Sunningdale Nurseries, Berks. Plants of North American origin are the easiest to grow in this country.

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