Lomatia tinctoria (Labill.) R. Br.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lomatia tinctoria' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lomatia/lomatia-tinctoria/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Embothrium tinctorium Labill.
  • L. silaifolia Hort., in part, not (Sm.) R. Br.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
bud
Immature shoot protected by scales that develops into leaves and/or flowers.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
linear
Strap-shaped.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lomatia tinctoria' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lomatia/lomatia-tinctoria/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

An evergreen, often suckering shrub usually 2 to 3 ft high (occasionally somewhat taller in the wild), glabrous in all its parts or with the young stems, leaf undersides, and inflorescence-axes covered with short appressed hairs. Leaves dark green, occasionally simple but more commonly pinnate or slightly bipinnate, 2 to 312 in. long, the segments linear, blunt or mucronate at the apex, parallel-sided or slightly contracted at the base. Inflorescences racemose, terminal or from the upper leaf-axils, 4 to 8 in. long, produced July-August. Flowers pale yellow, tipped green in the bud, heliotrope-scented, borne singly or in pairs on stalks about 58 in. long. Bot. Mag., t. 4110.

Native of Tasmania, where it is widespread up to 3,000 ft and often forms large colonies in dry places, introduced in 1822. It was once cultivated in green­houses for its elegant foliage, but is almost hardy and has lived for many years in the heath garden at Wakehurst Place, Sussex. Plants raised from seeds collected by the late Harold Comber during his Tasmanian expedition 1928-9 have survived many hard winters at Nymans and at Borde Hill in the same county. It needs a sunny sheltered position and a well-drained soil.

L. silaifolia (Sm.) R. Br. Embothrium silaifolium Sm. – This species, a native of the coastal parts of S.E. Australia, is allied to L. tinctoria and like it is of dwarf habit. But the leaves are larger, more elaborately divided, and the ultimate subdivisions widen towards the base. Some at least of the plants distributed under the name are really L. tinctoria.

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