Lonicera flava Sims

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera flava' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-flava/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Glossary

connate
Fused together with a similar part. (Cf. adnate.)
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera flava' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-flava/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

The real L. flava is perhaps not now in cultivation, or, if it be, it is extremely rare. It appears to be very local in its distribution, and was originally discovered on the summit of Paris Mountain, in S. Carolina, by John Fraser; introduced early in the 19th century. The plants that went in cultivation under the name were either L. prolifera or L. glaucescens, both of which are inferior to it. It is about the most beautiful of American honeysuckles. The bright orange-yellow flowers are about 114 in. long, the corolla-tube glabrous outside, slenderly tapered downwards, not bellied. The flowers are produced in two or more whorls on a stalked, terminal inflorescence; style glabrous. Leaves rather glaucous beneath, glabrous, the uppermost one to three pairs connate, not glaucous above as they are in L. prolifera. Bot. Mag., t. 1318.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

What is believed to be the true species is illustrated in The Garden (Journ. R.H.S.), Vol. 104, p. 218 (1979). The plant photographed was growing at the Henry Foundation near Philadelphia, USA.

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