Lonicera tangutica Maxim.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera tangutica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-tangutica/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Glossary

Tibet
Traditional English name for the formerly independent state known to its people as Bod now the Tibet (Xizang) Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The name Xizang is used in lists of Chinese provinces.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera tangutica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-tangutica/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

A deciduous spreading bush 4 to 6 ft high, with slender, usually glabrous twigs. Leaves obovate, more gradually tapered towards the base than towards the bluntish apex, 12 to 112 in. long, 14 to 34 in. wide, sprinkled with appressed hairs on both surfaces and on the margins; stalk 112 to 18 in. long. Flowers twin, yellowish white tinged with pink, about 12 in. long, each pair pendulous from the leaf-axils on a very slender stalk 12 to 112 in. long; corolla tubular, bellied at the base, glabrous, with almost equal lobes, produced in May and June. Fruits scarlet, united for about half their length.

Native of W. China and S.E. Tibet, discovered by Przewalski in Kansu in 1872. It was introduced in 1890 and later became more common through seeds sent home by Farrer from Kansu. It is distinct on account of its small obovate leaves and the long stalk on which each pair of flowers is borne. It is also one of the most beautiful in its pendulous scarlet fruits. Wilson’s specimens from Hupeh and Szechwan have leaves that are larger (up to 212 in. long) and proportionately narrower than those from Kansu. Forrest’s No. 19027 from Tsarong (S.E. Tibet) has downy shoots and some Delavay specimens collected in Yunnan resemble it in this respect.

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