Lyonia ligustrina (L.) DC.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lyonia ligustrina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lyonia/lyonia-ligustrina/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Vaccinium ligustrinum L.
  • L. paniculata Nutt.
  • Xolisma ligustrina (L.) Britt.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
reflexed
Folded backwards.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lyonia ligustrina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lyonia/lyonia-ligustrina/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

A deciduous shrub 3 to 8 ft high; young shoots either covered with a close soft down or nearly glabrous, and of a rather zigzag growth. Leaves alternate, oval or obovate, 2 to 3 in. long, 12 to 114 in. wide, entire or nearly so, pointed, covered with short down and dark green above, more downy beneath and paler, the nerves very prominent; stalk 18 in. long. Flowers produced in July and August on the leafless terminal portion of the preceding year’s growth, in downy racemes or small panicles 1 to 112 in. long, the whole forming a compound panicle from 3 to 6 in. long. Corolla downy, dull white, 18 to 316 in. wide, globose or orange-shaped, with five small, reflexed teeth at the nearly closed mouth. Calyx pale green or white, downy, appressed to the corolla. Seed-vessel a dry, five-celled capsule, with the calyx persisting at the base.

Native of eastern N. America; introduced in 1748. This is not one of the most attractive of the heath family, but is desirable through flowering so late in the season. It grows naturally in moist situations, but in cultivation thrives in ordinary peat or light sandy loam. Propagated by seed or by cuttings taken with a slight heel from the shoots that spring freely from beneath the flower panicle.

This species is very variable and the plant described above represents only one of many phases found in the wild. The following three varieties were all introduced to Britain early in the 19th century:


var. capreifolia (Wats.) DC.

Synonyms
L. capreifolia Wats

Leaves broad-elliptic or ovate, acuminate. Bracts of inflorescence leafy.

var. pubescens (A. Gray) Bean

Synonyms
Andromeda ligustrina var. pubescens A. Gray
Lyonia frondosa (Pursh) Nutt

Branches grey-hairy. Leaves appressed-hairy above, the whole plant of greyish aspect. Said to range from Virginia to Georgia.

var. salicifolia (Wats.) DC.

Synonyms
L. salicifolia Wats

Leaves lanceolate, slightly glossy.In addition Fernald recognises var. foliosiflora (Michx.) Fern., with the inflorescences leafy-bracted as in var. capreifolia, but the leaves narrower and not acuminate.

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