Nemopanthus mucronatus (L.) Trel.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Nemopanthus mucronatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/nemopanthus/nemopanthus-mucronatus/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Vaccinium mucronatum L.
  • N. canadensis (Michx.) DC.
  • Ilex canadensis Michx., not West.

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    berry
    Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    globose
    globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    perfect
    (botanical) All parts present and functional. Usually referring to both androecium and gynoecium of a flower.
    unisexual
    Having only male or female organs in a flower.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Nemopanthus mucronatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/nemopanthus/nemopanthus-mucronatus/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

    A deciduous shrub 3 to 10 ft high, with glabrous young wood. Leaves alternate, oval, oblong or ovate, thin, not (or very slightly) toothed, tapered more abruptly towards the base than the apex, quite glabrous, 1 to 212 in. long, 12 to 118 in. wide; stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Flowers often unisexual, small, of no beauty; produced from the leaf-axils usually singly, occasionally a few together on a thread-like stalk 12 to 1 in. long. Fruit a globose berry, 14 to 13 in. wide, pale crimson, containing four or five hard bony nutlets.

    Native of eastern N. America; introduced in 1802. Although introduced so long ago, this shrub never appears to have obtained much recognition in this country. Unless it bears its fruits freely it is of no garden value, and our summer sun is probably not hot enough to develop its best qualities in that respect. I have never seen it in Britain bearing fruit anything like so freely as it does in N. America.

    Some plants have flowers of both sexes as well as perfect flowers, others have those of one sex only.

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