Vaccinium praestans Lamb.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Vaccinium praestans' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/vaccinium/vaccinium-praestans/). Accessed 2020-09-20.

Genus

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
mucro
Short straight point. mucronate Bearing a mucro.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Vaccinium praestans' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/vaccinium/vaccinium-praestans/). Accessed 2020-09-20.

A low deciduous shrub with a creeping root-stock; its glabrous or downy mostly unbranched shoots growing 3 to 6 in. high. Leaves obovate, sometimes broadly oval, usually rounded at the apex except for a small mucro, or broadly tapered to a point; always slenderly tapered at the base to a short stalk, indistinctly toothed, 1 to 214 in. long, 12 to 112 in. wide, both surfaces green, glabrous above, sparsely hairy on the veins beneath. Flowers white, tinged with pink, produced in June two or three together or solitary at the base of the leafy part of the stem, each on a short downy stalk that is furnished with two narrow, leaf-like bracts. Corolla bell-shaped, 14 in. or less long, with erect lobes at the mouth; stamens downy; calyx-lobes rounded, ciliate. Fruits 25 to 12 in. wide, globose, bright glossy red, sweet and fragrant.

Native of N.E. Asia, including northern Japan, also of the Aleutians and Alaska. It was shortly described in 1810 from a specimen that had been collected in Kamchatka, but does not seem to have reached cultivation until Wilson introduced it from Sakhalin in 1914. It is remarkably distinct for a vaccinium in its low, creeping habit, in the shape and size of its leaves, and in its large fruits, which some say have a fragrance like strawberries. Inured as it is to severe cold in winter it succeeds best in the north and in Scotland. In southern England it needs the same conditions as Therorhodion kamtschaticum – a damp, peaty soil and a position where it gets abundant light but little direct sun.

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