Vinca difformis Pourr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Vinca difformis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/vinca/vinca-difformis/). Accessed 2020-12-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • V. media Hoffmanns. & Link
  • V. acutiflora Bertol.

Other species in genus

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Vinca difformis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/vinca/vinca-difformis/). Accessed 2020-12-03.

A trailing sub-shrubby plant in Britain usually dying back in winter, probably evergreen in S. Europe, of spreading growth, quite glabrous in leaf and stem. Leaves ovate, broadly wedge-shaped or rounded at the base, more tapered towards the apex, 112 to 3 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, entire, rich green on both surfaces, but rather paler beneath; stalk e to 13 in. long. Flowers solitary in the leaf-axils, produced in November and December on stalks 1 to 112 in. long. Corolla 112 in. across, very pale lilac-blue, the lobes obovate or rather rhomboidal, pointed; calyx-lobes awl-shaped, 14 in. long. Fruit awl-shaped, 112 in. long, Bot. Mag., t. 8506.

Native of southwest Europe as far east as Italy, and of northwest Africa. It resembles V. major in general appearance, but is easily distinguished by the absence of hairs on stem and leaf-margin and by the non-ciliate sepals. It is not so hardy as V. major, and at Kew it flowers too late to expand properly out-of-doors, but taken up and put under glass provides a continuous display during the darkest months of the year.