Zanthoxylum piperitum (L.) DC.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zanthoxylum piperitum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zanthoxylum/zanthoxylum-piperitum/). Accessed 2020-12-03.

Common Names

  • Japan Pepper

Synonyms

  • Fagara piperita L.

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
internode
Section of stem between two nodes.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
whorl
Arrangement of three or more organs (leaves flowers) around a central axis. whorled Arranged in a whorl.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zanthoxylum piperitum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zanthoxylum/zanthoxylum-piperitum/). Accessed 2020-12-03.

A compact, rounded, deciduous shrub; young shoots more or less downy when young, armed with flatfish spines 12 in. long arranged in pairs at each node. Leaves pinnate, from 3 to 6 in. long, with eleven to twenty-three leaflets, the main-stalk downy, having a few small spines on the lower side, and slightly winged. Leaflets 34 to 112 in. long, ovate, stalkless, toothed, with an occasional prickle on the midrib which is also downy above, dark green, but often yellow in the centre when young. Flowers in panicles 2 in. long at the end of short axillary twigs, small, green. Fruits reddish, dotted with glands. Seeds black, about the size of large shot.

Native of China and Japan, this shrub is, on the whole, the prettiest of these hardy species. Its neat, bushy habit and graceful foliage consisting of numerous small leaflets render it quite distinct among hardy shrubs. It most nearly resembles Z. schinifolium, but is easily distinguished by having its spines in pairs and flowers with a single whorl of segments (in Z. schinifolium the perianth is differentiated into sepals and petals). The seeds when ground are used by the Japanese as pepper.