Zauschneria

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zauschneria' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zauschneria/). Accessed 2020-12-03.

Family

  • Onagraceae

Common Names

  • California Fuchsia

Species in genus

Glossary

ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
key
(of fruit) Vernacular English term for winged samaras (as in e.g. Acer Fraxinus Ulmus)
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zauschneria' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zauschneria/). Accessed 2020-12-03.

A genus of four species in western North America (mainly in California) and northwest Mexico; they are herbaceous perennials but two become woody at the base and are usually classified as shrubs. Leaves more or less sessile, the lower ones opposite, the upper alternate. Flowers similar in most characters to those of the allied Fuchsia. Ovary globose, enclosed in the base of the floral tube (receptacle), which narrows above the ovary and then expands funnelwise. Sepals and petals four, spreading. Stamens eight. Fruit a capsule, resembling that of Epilobium. Seeds numerous, with a tuft of hairs at one end. The generic name commemorates Dr M. Zauschner, Professor of Natural History in the University of Prague (d. 1799).

The most recent study of the genus is: Clausen, Keck and Hiesey, ‘The Genus Zauschneria’, Carnegie Inst. Washington Publication 520, pp. 213-59 (1940), a work based on experimental cultivation and cytological study (botanical treatment and key by D. D. Keck.) See also: Munz, A California Flora (1959), pp. 926-7.