Alnus maximowiczii Callier

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Credits

Tim Baxter & Hugh A. McAllister (2021)

Recommended citation
Baxter, T. & McAllister, H.A. (2021), 'Alnus maximowiczii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/alnus/alnus-alnobetula-subsp-maximowiczii-defunct/). Accessed 2022-07-01.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Alnus viridis var. sibirica Reg.

Glossary

axil
Angle between the upper side of a leaf and the stem.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

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Credits

Tim Baxter & Hugh A. McAllister (2021)

Recommended citation
Baxter, T. & McAllister, H.A. (2021), 'Alnus maximowiczii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/alnus/alnus-alnobetula-subsp-maximowiczii-defunct/). Accessed 2022-07-01.

A deciduous tree up to 30 ft high, but more often a shrub; young shoots glabrous, older bark grey; buds sessile. Leaves broadly ovate, pointed, rounded or slightly heart-shaped at the base, the margins cut into numerous very fine, slender teeth, giving them a fringe-like appearance; 2 to 4 in. long, 112 to 3 in. wide; hairy when very young but glabrous later except for axil-tufts of down beneath; stalk 12 to 114 in. long; veins in eight to eleven pairs, bright green on both surfaces. Male catkins 2 in. long; fruits egg-shaped or cylindrical, 58 to 34 in. long, borne on slender, glabrous stalks.

Native of Japan, where it is common on many of the higher mountains; introduced in 1914. It belongs to the same group of alders as A. viridis, but is distinguished by the often heart-shaped base of the leaves and their fringe-like toothing. Very hardy.