Carmichaelia

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Carmichaelia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/carmichaelia/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

Family

  • Leguminosae

Glossary

family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Carmichaelia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/carmichaelia/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

A genus of shrubs in which some thirty-eight species are now recognised, of which fourteen were published by Simpson in 1945. All but one (found on Lord Howe Island) are natives of New Zealand. One of the most distinctive features of the genus is the very frequently flattened branches; another is the nearly always leafless condition of the shrubs at maturity; still another is the curious way in which the central part of the pod carrying the seeds falls out when quite ripe, leaving a sort of ring or empty framework. The carmichaelias make no great display of colour but they are pretty and very profuse in flower, and usually charmingly fragrant. The part played in the economy of most plants by leaves is, in this genus, largely performed by the green, flattened stems – not an uncommon occurrence in the broom family. C. petriei and C. enysii are apparently quite hardy; the other species described, with the exception of C. grandiflora, may need a sheltered spot close to a wall facing south or south-west.