Cassia

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cassia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cassia/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

Family

  • Leguminosae

Glossary

family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cassia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cassia/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

Out of several hundred species of Cassia known (and they occur in all the warmer parts of the globe except Europe), only two are grown outside in Britain, and of these the first species is decidedly tender, while the second, though hardy, scarcely qualifies as a woody plant. Cassia belongs to the sub-family Caesalpinioideae, in which the petals are equal, or almost so, in size and shape. Stamens usually ten, but three or five of these may be absent, or reduced to staminodes. Leaves pinnate, with an even number of leaflets. The fruits of certain Near Eastern species are the senna pods of druggists; those of the beautiful Indian laburnum (C. fistula) attain a length of 2 or even 3 ft.