Celastrus rugosus Rehd. & Wils.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Celastrus rugosus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/celastrus/celastrus-rugosus/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
included
(botanical) Contained within another part or organ.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Celastrus rugosus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/celastrus/celastrus-rugosus/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

A deciduous climber up to 20 ft high; young shoots not downy but furnished thickly with tiny lenticels. Leaves oval or ovate, rather conspicuously toothed, broadly wedge-shaped to rounded at the base, contracted at the apex to a short point; 212 to 512 in. long; wrinkled, not downy above, and with small wart­like excrescences or down on the midrib and chief veins beneath; stalk 13 to 12 in. long. Flowers small, greenish; solitary, few in axillary clusters, or produced in a short terminal raceme. Fruit 13 in. wide, orange-yellow; seed-coat red.

Native of W. China; discovered by Wilson in 1904, introduced to Kew in 1911 (Nos. 1106, 4157). It is very hardy and vigorous, producing annually long shoots thickly set with tiny warts and occasionally fine crops of its hand­some fruits. Its wrinkled leaves, very strongly veined beneath and frequently warted on the midrib, make it distinct. The pith is lamellate.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This is included by Hou in C. glaucophyllus.