Celtis labilis Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Celtis labilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/celtis/celtis-labilis/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Celtis labilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/celtis/celtis-labilis/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

A deciduous tree 40 to 60 ft high, its trunk 3 to 6 ft in girth, the bark smooth and pale grey; young shoots yellowish, densely downy. Leaves ovate to ovate-lanceolate, obliquely rounded at the base, the apex shortly but often slenderly pointed, rather coarsely toothed except towards the base; 112 to 4 in. long, half as much wide; dark glossy green and slightly downy above, duller and paler beneath. The pale-coloured veins are downy and the rest of the under-surface thinly downy or glabrous; stalk 18 to 13 in. long, very downy. Fruit orange-coloured, smooth, globose, scarcely 13 in. wide, produced in pairs or threes; fruit-stalks downy, 14 in. long.

Native of China in W. Hupeh and E. Szechwan; introduced by Wilson to the Arnold Arboretum in 1907 (No. 444), and to Kew the following year. Wilson remarks that it is easily recognised by the small, fruit-bearing branchlets dropping off in entirety when the fruits are ripe.