Ceratopetalum Sm.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Ceratopetalum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ceratopetalum/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

Family

  • Cunoniaceae

Species in genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
caducous
Falling off early.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
decussate
Leaf arrangement where the leaves are in opposite pairs each pair at right angles to the preceding pair (as e.g. the scale leaves of Cupressaceae).
domatia
Cavity or tuft of hairs that acts as a shelter for insects or other creatures.
endemic
(of a plant or an animal) Found in a native state only within a defined region or country.
hermaphrodite
Having both male and female parts in a single flower; bisexual.
indehiscent
Not opening naturally; remaining closed at maturity. (Cf. dehiscent.)
sclerophyllous
With tough leathery usually evergreen leaves. Typical of trees and shrubs from warm dry climates.
venation
Pattern of veins (nerves) especially in a leaf.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Ceratopetalum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ceratopetalum/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

The eight species of Ceratopetalum are endemic to eastern Australia, with the exception of C. succirubrum C.T. White, which extends into New Guinea (Fortune-Hopkins & Hoogland 2002). Most are tall rain-forest trees, though C. gummiferum is a shrub or small tree of sclerophyllous forest, and is the only one likely to have any chance in our area. Ceratopetalum have opposite, decussate leaves with one or three (rarely two) leaflets, prominent venation and no domatia, and resinous, caducous stipules. The inflorescences are terminal or axillary, rather sparse and subtended by reduced leaves or bracts. The branching pattern is basically decussate, with corymbs or cymes terminating the ultimate branches. The flowers are hermaphrodite and the petals are incised or absent. The fruit is an indehiscent capsule with woody wings formed from the persistent calyx lobes (Hoogland 1960, Fortune-Hopkins & Hoogland 2002, Rozefelds & Barnes 2002).