Cinnamomum glanduliferum (Wall.) Meissn.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Cinnamomum glanduliferum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cinnamomum/cinnamomum-glanduliferum/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Cinnamomum glanduliferum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cinnamomum/cinnamomum-glanduliferum/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

Tree 5–15(–20) m, 0.3 m dbh. Bark greyish brown with deep, longitudinal fissures, revealing reddish brown inner bark; camphor-scented. Branchlets robust, angular, greenish brown. Leaves evergreen, alternate, 6–15 × 4–6.5 cm, shape extremely variable, elliptic to ovate or lanceolate, leathery, upper surface glossy dark green and glabrous, lower surface glaucous, usually glabrous, four to five pairs of lateral veins, vein axils conspicuously puckered, margins entire, apex acute to short-acuminate; petiole 1.5–3.5 cm long, robust, glabrous. Inflorescence axillary, paniculate, 4–10 cm long. Flowers small, to 0.3 cm long, yellowish; perianth six-lobed, hairy inside; stamens nine, staminodes three. Drupe globose, to 1 cm diameter, black; cupule about 1 cm long, red. Flowering March to May, fruiting July to September (China). Li et al. 2005. Distribution CHINA: Guizhou, Sichuan, Xizang, Yunnan; INDIA; MALAYSIA; MYANMAR; NEPAL; THAILAND. Habitat Broadleaved evergreen forest between 1500 and 2500(–3000) m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated. Cross-references B614, S172, K327.

Cinnamomum glanduliferum received minimal treatment by Bean (1976a) and Clarke (1988), but seems to have been in cultivation in southwestern England for some time. The specimen at Trewidden, Cornwall noted by Bean achieved 10 m, while the current British champion is 9 m at Ventnor Botanic Garden, Isle of Wight (Johnson 2007). The origins of these trees are unknown. It is also cultivated in California, but trees on the Stanford University campus have apparently been damaged by frost (Trees of Stanford 2008). Johnson (2007) considers it to be ‘a better prospect’ in the United Kingdom than C. camphora, but it does not appear to be as hardy as C. japonicum or C. parthenoxylon.