Citronella mucronata (Ruiz & Pavon) D. Don

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Citronella mucronata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/citronella/citronella-mucronata/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

Synonyms

  • Villaresia mucronata Ruiz & Pavon, nom. gen. illegit.
  • Citronella chilensis (Mol.) Munz
  • Villaresia chilensis (Mol.) Stunz
  • Citrus chilensis Mol. sec. Miers, not Mol.

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    synonym
    (syn.) (botanical) An alternative or former name for a taxon usually considered to be invalid (often given in brackets). Synonyms arise when a taxon has been described more than once (the prior name usually being the one accepted as correct) or if an article of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature has been contravened requiring the publishing of a new name. Developments in taxonomic thought may be reflected in an increasing list of synonyms as generic or specific concepts change over time.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Citronella mucronata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/citronella/citronella-mucronata/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

    The explanation for the synonym C. chilensis is that in 1782 Molina gave a short description of a Chilean plant which he named Citrus chilensis. If this was in fact the present species, as some botanists believe, the epithet chilensis would be the correct one to use.

    The original tree at Abbotsbury in Dorset, planted around 1840 and about 60 ft high in 1911, no longer exists. This tree, even when some seventy years old, still bore the spiny foliage characteristic of young trees and suckers, and this is true of the present tree in the garden, which measures 26 × 1 ft 8 in. at 212 ft. It has been propagated, and plants distributed to a number of collections. The example in the National Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, Eire, measures 23 × 414 ft (1980).