Clematoclethra actinidioides Maxim.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Clematoclethra actinidioides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/clematoclethra/clematoclethra-actinidioides/). Accessed 2021-09-28.

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
cordate
Heart-shaped (i.e. with two equal lobes at the base).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Clematoclethra actinidioides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/clematoclethra/clematoclethra-actinidioides/). Accessed 2021-09-28.

A climber up to 40 ft or more high; young shoots glabrous. Leaves ovate to ovate-lanceolate, sometimes inclined to obovate, acuminate, rounded to cordate at the base, finely bristle-toothed; stalk 1 to 2 in. long, slender. Flowers 38 in. wide, axillary, solitary, in pairs, or in threes on stalks 12 to 34 in. long; petals rounded, white faintly flushed with rose; sepals ciliate, broadly ovate to obovate or roundish. Fruit a nearly globose, black or purplish black berry, 14 in. wide, seated on the calyx. Bot. Mag., t. 9439.

Native of China, mainly in the provinces of Szechwan and Kansu; introduced in 1908. It was successfully grown and flowered by the late Lord Wakehurst in his garden near Ardingly in Sussex.

C. integrifolia Maxim. Introduced by Wilson from W. China in 1908, this is very near C. actinidioides and has, in fact, been made synonymous with it in the Botanical Magazine. The leaves are glabrous and glaucous beneath. It climbs 20 to 25 ft high, the flowers white and fragrant. Discovered by Potanin, the Russian traveller, in Kansu, in 1887. The name integrifolia does not entirely fit the plants now attributed to the species, for they have finely bristle-toothed leaves.

C. lasioclada Maxim. has downy, not bristly, young shoots. The leaves are ovate, 2 to 4 in. long, bristle-toothed, and have tufts of down in the vein-axils beneath; stalks up to 212 in. long. Flowers white, in cymes of two to seven blossoms. Fruit globose, 13 in. wide, black. This is a climber 20 to 25 ft high according to Wilson, who introduced it from W. China in 1908.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

It was stated in the original printing of the current edition that this species was grown by Lord Wakehurst in his garden near Ardingly. In fact it still grows there, at Wakehurst Place, now an extension of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. It also does well at Rowallane in Co. Down.