Comptonia peregrina (L.) Coult.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Comptonia peregrina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/comptonia/comptonia-peregrina/). Accessed 2021-03-02.

Genus

Common Names

  • Sweet Fern

Synonyms

  • Liquidambar (sic) peregrina L.
  • C. peregrina var. tomentosa Cheval.

Infraspecifics

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    nut
    Dry indehiscent single-seeded fruit with woody outer wall.
    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    inflorescence
    Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.
    midrib
    midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
    ovary
    Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Comptonia peregrina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/comptonia/comptonia-peregrina/). Accessed 2021-03-02.

    A deciduous shrub 2 to 4 ft high, with slender, often erect branches, very hairy when young. Leaves alternate, linear-oblong, tapered at both ends, 2 to 4 in. long, 13 to 58 in. wide, the blade deeply cleft (almost to the midrib) into broad, oblique, rounded lobes, 18 to 14 in. wide; dark green, downy; stalk 18 to 14 in. long. Male catkins cylindrical, 34 to 1 in. long, 16 in. wide; closely set with downy, broadly triangular, long-pointed bracts. Female inflorescence globular, each ovary surrounded by eight awl-shaped, downy scales, which give the fruit-cluster a bur-like appearance. Nut egg-shaped, 15 in. long, shining.

    Native of eastern N. America; introduced in 1714, and long a favourite in gardens because of its beautifully cut, fern-like leaves, and pleasant bay-like scent. It likes a peaty soil and objects to lime.


    var. asplenifolia (L.) Fern.

    Synonyms
    Myrica asplenifolia L. Comptonia asplenifolia (L.) Ait

    Branchlets only faintly downy; leaves smaller than in the type, almost glabrous. It is found in the coastal plain from Long Island to Virginia, while typical C. peregrina, in various degrees of downiness, is confined to the mountains. Probably most or all of the plants grown in gardens as Comptonia asplenifolia belong to typical C. peregrina, not to the variety.