Coprosma nitida Hook. f.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Coprosma nitida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/coprosma/coprosma-nitida/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

Genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Coprosma nitida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/coprosma/coprosma-nitida/). Accessed 2021-09-18.

A densely branched shrub of variable habit: at high altitudes it forms dense, low masses but in more favourable situations is erect and may reach a height of 8 ft or more. Branches stiff, more or less glabrous. Leaves glossy and leathery, closely set on the stems, oblong-elliptic to lanceolate, 16 to 45 in. long. Flowers solitary at the end of short axillary spurs, male and female borne on separate plants. Fruits red or orange. A native of Tasmania and Victoria, where it is common in mountains above 2,500 ft; introduced by Comber in 1929. Mr Hadden of Porlock, who supplied the material for the figure in the Botanical Magazine (n.s., t. 88), tells us that his plants were killed many years ago in a hard winter.