Coronilla emerus L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Coronilla emerus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/coronilla/coronilla-emerus/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

Genus

Common Names

  • Scorpion Senna

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
articulated
Jointed.
distichous
Arranged in two vertical ranks.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
keel petal
(in the flowers of some legumes) The two front petals fused together to form a keel-like structure.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
standard petal
(in the flowers of some legumes) Large upper petal; also known as ‘vexillum’.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Coronilla emerus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/coronilla/coronilla-emerus/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

A deciduous shrub 7 to 9 ft high, and as much through, of elegant habit. Branchlets angled, grooved, and glabrous. Leaves 1 to 212 in. long, alternate, pinnate, distichous, composed usually of seven or nine leaflets, which are obovate, 13 to 34 in. long, slightly downy when young. Flowers borne on slender stalks, 1 to 2 in. long, springing from the leaf-axils, and carrying not more than three flowers at the top. These are yellow, 34 in. long, and distinct on account of the long claw to each petal; the standard petal has a reddish-brown line down the back. Pods 2 in. long, very slender, round, and jointed into several portions, each portion containing one seed. Bot. Mag., t. 445.

Native of Central and S. Europe; cultivated in England for more than three centuries. This is a very pleasing, graceful hardy shrub, which begins to flower in May and continues until October. The popular name refers to the slender articulated seed-pod, which is compared to a scorpion’s tail. It is very abundant, as an undergrowth in thin woodland, in some places along the French and Italian Riviera.