Corylopsis veitchiana Bean

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Corylopsis veitchiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/corylopsis/corylopsis-veitchiana/). Accessed 2021-07-25.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
included
(botanical) Contained within another part or organ.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
spike
Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Corylopsis veitchiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/corylopsis/corylopsis-veitchiana/). Accessed 2021-07-25.

A shrub 5 to 6 ft high, of rounded, bushy habit; young shoots quite glabrous, reddish. Leaves oval or ovate, with a heart-shaped base; contracted at the apex to a short, slender point; 2 to 4 in. long, 112 to 2 in. wide; purplish and sparingly silky-hairy beneath when young, somewhat glaucous and perfectly glabrous when fully grown; veins in six or seven pairs, the lowest pair giving off four to six nerves outwards; stalk about 13 in. long. Flowers fragrant, primrose-yellow, produced in a nodding spike 1 to 2 in. long, 34 in. wide. Basal bracts glabrous outside; floral bracts hairy outside. Anthers red-brown, distinctly protruded. Calyx-lobes short, rounded, hairy. Fruit at first densely hairy, about 13 in. long. Bot. Mag., t. 8349.

Introduced in 1900 by Wilson from Western Hupeh, China, and first raised in the Coombe Wood nursery. It flowers regularly in April but the blossoms are liable to be injured by late frosts. From C. sinensis it differs in its glabrous leaves and protruded red-brown anthers.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This species is reduced by Morley and Chao to the status of forma under C. sinensis var. calvescens.

[C. willmottiae] This is included by Morley and Chao in the typical part of C. sinensis.