Corylopsis willmottiae Rehd. & Wils.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Corylopsis willmottiae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/corylopsis/corylopsis-willmottiae/). Accessed 2021-09-28.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
truncate
Appearing as if cut off.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Corylopsis willmottiae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/corylopsis/corylopsis-willmottiae/). Accessed 2021-09-28.

A deciduous shrub 6 to 12 ft high; young shoots brown, not downy, but with numerous small lenticels; winter buds pale shining green, stalked. Leaves 2 to 4 in. long, oval, obovate or roundish ovate; truncate or slightly heart-shaped at the base, short-pointed; dark bright green and glabrous above; rather glaucous beneath and downy, especially on the midrib and veins; veins in seven to ten pairs. Flowers soft greenish yellow and fragrant. Calyx, ovary, and fruit glabrous. Seeds shining black. Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 438.

Native of W. Szechwan, China; introduced by Wilson in 1909; first shown in flower at the Horticultural Hall, 5 th March 1912, as “C. multiflora”. The true plant of that name does not appear to be in cultivation. It was given an Award of Merit on that occasion and an F.C.C. in 1965, when shown from Borde Hill, Sussex. A graceful and very floriferous species. It is allied to C. sinensis and some plants so labelled in gardens may be C. willmottiae. However, in that species the young branchlets are downy and the leaf-stalks densely so. See also C. platypetala.