Corynocarpus J.R. Forst. & G. Forst.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Corynocarpus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/corynocarpus/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

Family

  • Corynocarpaceae

Species in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
drupe
A fleshy dehiscent or indehiscent fruit with one to several seeds each enclosed in a hard endocarp (the stone).
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hermaphrodite
Having both male and female parts in a single flower; bisexual.
imbricate
Overlapping.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Corynocarpus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/corynocarpus/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

There are five species of Corynocarpus, occurring in New Guinea, New Caledonia, Australia and New Zealand. The genus has been assigned to many different families, though the consensus now is to place it in its own family Corynocarpaceae, in the order Cucurbitales (Philipson 1987, Wagstaff & Dawson 2000, APG 2003). They are evergreen trees or shrubs with simple, leathery leaves, C. laevigatus being the only candidate for cultivation in temperate latitudes. The leaves are alternate or rarely in whorls, and glabrous, rarely spiny. The inflorescences are rather thick, stiff panicles in a terminal position. The flowers are regular, hermaphrodite and 5-merous. The petals and sepals are free, but imbricate, and there are five staminodes as well as five stamens. The fruit is a drupe and the seeds have no endosperm (Allan 1961, Guymer 1984).