Cowania stansburiana Torr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cowania stansburiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cowania/cowania-stansburiana/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

Genus

Synonyms

  • C. mexicana var. stansburiana (Torr.) Jeps.

Other species in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glandular
Bearing glands.
linear
Strap-shaped.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Cowania stansburiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/cowania/cowania-stansburiana/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

An aromatic evergreen shrub up to 6 ft high in a wild state, of stiff, sparse habit; young shoots thickly furnished with glands. Leaves alternate, mostly in clusters, three- or five-lobed, 14 to 12 in. long; lobes linear with recurved margins, glandular above, covered with white down beneath, very stiff in texture. Flowers fragrant, solitary at the end of short twigs, 34 in. wide, white or pale yellow; petals five, obovate; calyx funnel-shaped at the base, with five lobes, glandular and downy like the flower-stalk; stamens numerous. Seed-vessels terminated by slender styles 1 to 112 in. long, densely furnished with silky white hairs.

Native of the S.W. United States from Nevada, Utah, and Colorado to S. California, also of N. Mexico; discovered by Howard Stansbury in 1852 during his expedition to the great Salt Lake of Utah. This species and C. mexicana D. Don, are closely allied. Jepson, the Californian botanist, made it a variety of C. mexicana, and this status is accepted by Munz in A California Flora (1959). The calyx of C. mexicana is more bell-shaped than funnel-shaped. Both need the sunniest position that can be given them.

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