Danae racemosa (L.) Moench

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Danae racemosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/danae/danae-racemosa/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Ruscus racemosus L.
  • D. laurus Med.

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    berry
    Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
    bisexual
    See hermaphrodite.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    lanceolate
    Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.

    References

    There are no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Danae racemosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/danae/danae-racemosa/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

    An elegant evergreen shrub 2 to 4 ft high, with green, slender, erect or spreading semi-woody stems, once-branched and quite glabrous. ‘Leaves’ alternate, oblong-lanceolate, 112 to 4 in. long, 14 to 112 in. wide; bright green on both surfaces, taper-pointed, abruptly narrowed at the base but scarcely stalked. Flowers greenish yellow, small, bisexual, produced four to six together at the end of the branches each on a stalk, 18 in. long. Fruit a berry, 14 in. across, red, with a pale, saucer-shaped disk at the base.

    Native of N. Persia and Asia Minor; introduced in 1713. It is a pretty evergreen with a rather bamboo-like habit. The sprays are valuable for winter cutting, and placed in vases in association with flowers, remain fresh a long time, and very pleasing in their cheerful, polished green. The plant thrives well in semi-shaded spots in moist soil. Its fruits are not borne regularly with us, but seeds can be purchased from seedsmen. Failing them, it is easily increased by division in spring.