Daphne acutiloba Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Daphne acutiloba' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/daphne/daphne-acutiloba/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
oblanceolate
Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Daphne acutiloba' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/daphne/daphne-acutiloba/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

An evergreen shrub 4 to 8 ft high, with an often bi-forked branching; young shoots covered with pale, forward-pointing bristles, becoming glabrous and purplish brown the second season. Leaves leathery, mostly oblanceolate or lanceolate, tapered to both ends, pointed, 2 to 4 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, glossy and quite glabrous on both surfaces; scarcely stalked. Flowers white, borne during July in stalked heads of six or more at, or near, the apex of the shoots; perianth tubular, 34 in. long, 58 in. wide across the four narrowly ovate-oblong lobes, not downy; flower-stalks bristly. Fruit at first scarlet, then dark red.

Native of China; introduced by Wilson in 1907-8 from Hupeh and Szechwan. It is related closely to D. odora but is inferior to that species as regards its blossom, which has no fragrance (or only an intermittent one); the fruit, however, is handsome.