Daphne retusa Hemsl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Daphne retusa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/daphne/daphne-retusa/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Genus

Glossary

Tibet
Traditional English name for the formerly independent state known to its people as Bod now the Tibet (Xizang) Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The name Xizang is used in lists of Chinese provinces.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.
revolute
Rolled downwards at margin.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Daphne retusa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/daphne/daphne-retusa/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

A low, densely branched, evergreen shrub, of close, neat, sturdy habit; young shoots hairy. Leaves leathery, thick, densely arranged towards the end of the twig; oval inclined to obovate; 1 to 2 in. long, 12 to 34 in. wide; stalkless, the base tapered, the apex rounded and notched, margin revolute; dark glossy green, glabrous. Flowers produced during early May in a crowded cluster 3 in. across terminating the branch, each flower borne on a short, conspicuously brown-felted stalk; perianth tube glabrous, 58 in. long; rosy purple outside; glistening white, tinged with purple inside; lobes ovate, 13 in. long. Fruit bright red. Bot. Mag., t. 8430.

Native of W. China and the E. Himalaya; discovered by Pratt near Tatsien-lu (Kangting) at 13,500 ft elevation. Introduced from the same spot by Wilson in 1901 and more recently by Ludlow, Sherriff and Elliot from S.E. Tibet (LSE 15756). This delightful daphne makes a compact bush growing slowly to about 2 ft high; the flowers are fragrant, like lilac. It is very hardy and amenable to cultivation. See also D. tangutica.


D × mantensiana T. M. C. Taylor & F. Vrugtman

A hybrid between D. × burkwoodii and D. retusa, raised at Manten’s nursery, British Columbia, and put into commerce in 1953. It is a bushy evergreen shrub with very fragrant flowers resembling those of D. retusa in their colouring. Leaves oblong or narrow-obovate, retuse at the apex. It is in cultivation at Wisley and other gardens. The original clone has been named ‘Manten’.