Deutzia maximowicziana Makino.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Deutzia maximowicziana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/deutzia/deutzia-maximowicziana/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Deutzia discolor Maxim., not Hemsl.
  • D. hypoleuca Maxim.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Deutzia maximowicziana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/deutzia/deutzia-maximowicziana/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

A deciduous shrub 5 or 6 ft high, with brown slender branches furnished with starry down. Leaves narrowly oval-lanceolate, slenderly pointed, wedge-shaped at the base, inconspicuously toothed, 112 to 312 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, covered with a white, very close down beneath; stalk about 18 in. long. Flowers white, 34 in. wide, borne in May on erect, slender panicles 2 to 312 in. long, that terminate short lateral twigs carrying one or two pairs of leaves; petals oblong; calyx cup-shaped with short teeth.

Native of Japan; introduced in 1915. It is closely related botanically to D. scabra, differing from that well-known species in the long narrow leaves being white beneath (green in scabra) and in the more slender growths.

Footnotes

In previous editions of this work, this species was named D. hypoleuca. It was described by Maximowicz in 1888 as D. discolor, evidently in ignorance of the fact that Hemsley had used that name for another species in the previous year. In 1892 Maximowicz renamed his own species as D. hypoleuca, but he was antedated by Makino, who, in the same year, but nine months earlier, had named the species in honour of its author.