Deutzia wilsonii Duthie

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Deutzia wilsonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/deutzia/deutzia-wilsonii/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Genus

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
acute
Sharply pointed.
corymbose
In form of corymb.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
stellate
Star-shaped.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Deutzia wilsonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/deutzia/deutzia-wilsonii/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

A shrub 4 to 6 ft high, whose young branches are slightly scurfy at first, soon becoming dark reddish brown; the bark peeling. Leaves 2 to 5 in. long, 58 to 112 in. wide, ovate-oblong to oblong-lanceolate, tapered or rounded at the base, acute or acuminate, rough, with four- to ten-rayed stellate hairs above, dark dull green; grey beneath, and covered with minute stellate scurf, and furnished also with pale bristle-like simple hairs, especially along the midrib and veins. Flowers in corymbose panicles; each flower nearly 1 in. across, white; longer stamens with tapered wings, shorter ones toothed. Bot. Mag., t. 8083.

Native of W. and Central China; discovered and introduced by Wilson about 1901. It is a handsome shrub allied to D. discolor, but distinct in the hairiness of the lower surface of the leaves, suggesting D. mollis when young. It has been suggested that it may be a hybrid between this species and D. discolor.