Diospyros armata Hemsl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Diospyros armata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/diospyros/diospyros-armata/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Diospyros armata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/diospyros/diospyros-armata/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

A semi-evergreen tree of sturdy, rounded habit 20 ft high, much branched the branchlets clothed with a thick minute down, and occasionally terminated by a stout thorn. Leaves 12 to 212 in. long, 12 to 114 in. wide, entire, the smaller ones roundish, the larger ones oval, tapered about equally at both ends, blunt or rounded at the apex, dark shining green, the midrib minutely downy above, minutely hairy beneath; the blade is specked with minute transparent dots; stalk 18 in. or less long. Flowers not seen. Fruit yellow, roundish, 34 in. in diameter, furnished with appressed bristles; borne on a stalk about 12 in. long and set in a persistent calyx, the four lobes of which are ovate, 12 in. long.

Native of Central China; discovered by Henry, introduced by Wilson in 1904, and now growing in the open air at Kew apparently quite hardy, and forming a sturdy bush. In the original description the leaves are described as persistent, but cultivated plants are quite deciduous in hard winters.