Dipteronia sinensis Oliver

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Dipteronia sinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/dipteronia/dipteronia-sinensis/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    lanceolate
    Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    imparipinnate
    Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
    polygamous
    With unisexual and bisexual flowers on same plant.

    References

    There are no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Dipteronia sinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/dipteronia/dipteronia-sinensis/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

    A deciduous, small tree up to 30 ft high, with a trunk 6 in. or more in diameter, or sometimes merely a big bush. Leaves opposite, pinnate, 9 to 12 in. long, consisting usually of from seven to eleven leaflets, which are opposite, ovate or lanceolate, short-stalked; 112 to 4 in. long, one-third as much wide, sharply, coarsely, and irregularly toothed, covered like the twigs when young with scattered hairs; there are small tufts in the vein axils. Panicles erect, pyramidal, 6 to 12 in. long. Flowers polygamous, very small, greenish white; stamens white, six to eight, 18 in. long. Fruits produced in large clusters, each one composed of two flat, winged carpels (like the fruits of wych-elm or Ptelea), obovate, 34 to 1 in. long, soft red.

    Native of Central China, at from 3,500 to 5,000 ft elevation. This interesting and handsome species was introduced by Wilson for Messrs Veitch about 1900. It is beautiful in foliage, and its fruits are very interesting; it flowered at Kew in June 1912, but the blossoms were in no way effective. It is evidently quite hardy, thriving well in good soil, and can be propagated by cuttings taken in July and put in gentle bottom heat; it also roots readily from layers.

    There is an example measuring 37 × 3 ft at Hergest Croft, Heref. (1969).