Enkianthus chinensis Franch.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Enkianthus chinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/enkianthus/enkianthus-chinensis/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Synonyms

  • E. himalaicus var. chinensis (Franch.) Diels
  • E. sinohimalaicus Craib

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
pubescent
Covered in hairs.
striated
Bearing fine longitudinal stripes grooves or ridges.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Enkianthus chinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/enkianthus/enkianthus-chinensis/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

A shrub 8 to 12 ft high; young shoots glabrous. Leaves lanceolate to oblong or oval, 2 to 3 in. long, 34 to 114 in. wide, tapered to both ends, pointed, shallowly bluntly toothed, downy along the midrib above, bright green above, rather glaucous and glabrous beneath; stalk slender, up to 1 in. long. Flowers in pendulous racemes of one to two dozen, 3 to 5 in. long. Corolla bell-shaped, 38 in. long and a little wider at the mouth, yellowish striated conspicuously with rose; lobes rose-coloured, recurved. Bot. Mag., t. 9413.

Native of W. China and N.E. Upper Burma. Judging by descriptions made by collectors and the plate in the Botanical Magazine, the colour of its flowers would appear to be somewhat variable although rose is usually dominant. The species is closely akin to E. deflexus (himalaicus), but that species is well distinguished by its pubescent leaves. E. chinensis was introduced in 1900.