Enkianthus quinqueflorus Lour.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Enkianthus quinqueflorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/enkianthus/enkianthus-quinqueflorus/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
reflexed
Folded backwards.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Enkianthus quinqueflorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/enkianthus/enkianthus-quinqueflorus/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

A deciduous or semi-evergreen bush 3 to 6 ft high (occasionally in a wild state a small tree); young shoots and leaves quite glabrous. Leaves of stout leathery texture, narrowly oval or obovate, entire, sharply pointed, tapered at the base, 2 to 4 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, reddish when unfolding, changing to dark bright green, and very much net-veined; stalk 14 to 34 in. long. Flowers nodding, produced (often in clusters of five) in the axils of large pink bracts in spring, each on a pink stalk 12 to 1 in. long. Corolla bell-shaped, pink, 38 to 12 in. long, with five reflexed shallow lobes of paler hue and five nectaries at the base. Calyx-lobes varying from shallowly to slenderly triangular, minutely ciliate. Fruit a dry capsule, erect, egg-shaped, 38 in. long, strongly ribbed. Bot. Mag., t. 1649.

Native of China, including Hong Kong; first flowered in Knight’s Royal Exotic Nursery at Chelsea (afterwards Veitch’s) in 1814. It is too tender for any but the mildest parts of the British Isles and requires the protection of a cool greenhouse at Kew. It is unsurpassed among enkianthuses in the size and beauty of the individual flowers and the clusters with their attendant pink bracts give a charming effect.