Erica scoparia L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Erica scoparia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/erica/erica-scoparia/). Accessed 2021-09-22.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
stigma
(in a flower) The part of the carpel that receives pollen and on which it germinates. May be at the tip of a short or long style or may be reduced to a stigmatic surface at the apex of the ovary.
exserted
Protruding; pushed out.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
included
(botanical) Contained within another part or organ.
linear
Strap-shaped.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Erica scoparia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/erica/erica-scoparia/). Accessed 2021-09-22.

A shrub of loose, uneven habit, as much as 9 or 10 ft high, its branches erect and, like the leaves, free from down. Leaves in whorls of threes (sometimes fours), 14 in. long, linear, pointed, glossy dark green. Flowers produced in May and June, in clusters of two to five, in the leaf-axils, over almost the whole of the preceding year’s growth. Corolla greenish, 18 in. long, globular. Calyx and flower-stalk quite glabrous. Stigma included or slightly exserted.

Native of S.W. Europe, N. Africa and Madeira, and much used there for making besoms. It is hardy; and, though loose and irregular in habit, it is decidedly elegant. It blossoms with great freedom, but the blossoms are small and of no great beauty, and it is only for its beauty of habit that it is desirable.


'Pumila'

A dwarf form, growing to about 2 ft high. This, or a similar clone, was in cultivation at Woburn in 1825 as E. scoparia minima.