Eucalyptus acaciiformis H. Deane & Maiden

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus acaciiformis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-acaciiformis/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Common Names

  • Wattle-leaved Peppermint

Glossary

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus acaciiformis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-acaciiformis/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Tree to 20 m. Bark greyish brown, rough, fibrous throughout. Branchlets green. Juvenile leaves alternate, petiolate, elliptic, greyish green. Adult leaves green, 5–10 × 1–1.5 cm, lanceolate, lateral veins just visible, margins entire, apex acuminate; petiole slightly flattened, 0.6–1.8 cm long. Inflorescences axillary and solitary; umbellasters with seven flowers. Flower buds ovoid to obovoid to fusiform; hypanthium hemispherical, 0.2–0.3 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule hemispherical, 0.4–0.5 cm diameter; valves three to four, level or slightly exserted. Chippendale 1988, Hill 2004. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (Northern Tablelands). Habitat Mixed woodland on slopes and ridges. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated.

Eucalyptus acaciiformis is considered to be a good feature tree by the Gum Group (2007), forming a nicely shaped specimen with an open crown. The leaves are small, and could cause confusion with E. nicholii, but are darker green and shorter in the adult phase. The young growth flushes red-bronze and the twigs are red when young. It seems to be hardy in southern England, and in Oregon some provenances have withstood –6ºC without damage, although trees from another provenance were damaged at –3 to –4 ºC (S. Hogan, pers. comm. 2007). Growth is rapid, with 8 m being achieved in five years in Surrey (M. & T. Milton, pers. comm. 2007), and 5.5 m in three years in Oregon (S. Hogan, pers. comm. 2007).