Eucalyptus albida Maiden & Blakely

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus albida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-albida/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Common Names

  • White-leaved Mallee

Glossary

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus albida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-albida/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Mallee to 3 m. Bark white or greyish brown, often powdery, smooth throughout. Juvenile leaves white, waxy, sessile and amplexicaul, decussate, orbicular to cordate; the change from juvenile to adult foliage is abrupt. Adult leaves glossy, dark green, 4–7 × 0.5–1.5 cm, narrowly lanceolate, lateral veins obscure, margins entire, apex acute; petiole terete, 0.7–1.7 cm long. Inflorescences axillary and solitary; umbellasters with seven or nine flowers. Flower buds fusiform; hypanthium hemispherical or obconical, 0.3–0.4 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule hemispherical or obconical, 0.4–0.8 cm diameter; valves three (to four), ± level. Chippendale 1988, Hill 2004. Distribution AUSTRALIA: Western Australia (Tammin to Ravensthorpe). Habitat Heaths on white sand. USDA Hardiness Zone 9(–10). Conservation status Not evaluated.

As a juvenile plant Eucalyptus albida is perhaps the most silvery of all the eucalypts, well deserving its specific epithet. The leaves are very densely placed on the twigs, resulting in a remarkable silvery white bush, which can be maintained by coppicing. It also makes a good container plant. In adulthood the leaves are longer and glossy dark green. Never a large tree, E. albida is probably best regarded in our area as a striking ornamental foliage shrub, although adult specimens are known outside in the United Kingdom. It is very sensitive to excess moisture, and extremely sharp drainage is re com mended. A sheltered site is also desirable, as the new growth is prone to damage from both wind and frost (Gum Group 2007).