Eucalyptus amygdalina Labill.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus amygdalina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-amygdalina/). Accessed 2021-09-22.

Common Names

  • Black Peppermint

Synonyms

  • E. salicifolia Cav.

Glossary

dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus amygdalina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-amygdalina/). Accessed 2021-09-22.

Tree 15–30(–40) m tall, dbh 1 m. Bark grey to greyish brown and finely fibrous on trunk and larger branches; salmon-pink, white or grey on smaller branches and branchlets. Leaves have a strong peppermint odour. Juvenile leaves sessile, 2.8–5.5 × 0.2–1.1 cm, lanceolate and green to subglaucous. Adult leaves thin and dull green, 7–12 × 0.5–1.3 cm, lanceolate to linear and falcate, lateral veins indistinct, margins entire, apex acuminate or hooked; petiole flattened, 0.7–1 cm long. Inflorescences axillary and solitary; umbellasters with 11–15 flowers (rarely more). Flower buds green to yellow, smooth or slightly warty; hypanthium 0.2–0.3 cm wide; stamens white. Capsule hemispherical to cup-shaped, 0.5–0.7 cm diameter; valves three to four, flush with capsule mouth or protruding slightly. Boland et al. 1984, Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: Tasmania (central and northeast). Habitat Open sclerophyllous forest on hills and mountain slopes, between 0 and 750 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone (8–)9–10. Conservation status Not evaluated. Cross-reference K48. Taxonomic note Closely related to E. pulchella Desf. (see p. 351), but that species has smooth bark.

This lowland Tasmanian species with narrow leaves has a marginal presence in our area, and is on the verge of hardiness in southern England. Tom Hart Dyke collected it from five provenances in 2002 and had trees doing very well at Lullingstone Castle, having reached 10 m, until the November frosts of 2005 killed them outright. Johnson (2007) has recorded a 13 m tree at Ventnor Botanical Garden on the Isle of Wight; another specimen was 13 m tall (32 cm dbh) in 2008, at the Sir Harold Hillier Gardens. There is a grove of 40 m trees at Glenealy, Co. Dublin, planted in 1935 (J. Purse, pers. comm. 2007).